Monday, June 12, 2017

Winds of change - 27


(This is the twenty seventh part of a short story which is entirely a work of fiction.)

Over the next few days, each of the remaining parts of the plan got rolled out.

The Vigilance committee got into action. They would pick up the copies of the prescriptions and check. The Departmental Committees started interfacing with the Medical Representatives to evaluate new products and other consumables. The surveys were also rolled out.

The Marketing Campaign was the most visible aspect of the project. Huge hoardings of the hospital were set up in the city’s busy junctions and nearby towns. A TV and radio campaign was also run simultaneously. The goal was to get people aware of the way the hospital was being run and encourage them to try it out.

Vasudha and Manav would review the numbers on a daily basis.

Soon, the first month of the project drew to a close. At the end of the review, Vasudha and Manav did a detailed review of all the numbers. They were disappointed to see nothing much had changed overall. They decided to do a department by department analysis. They found that while all other departments had shown a minor growth compared to previous numbers, the orthopaedic and cardiology departments had actually shown significant dips.

Vasudha asked Manav to get doctor wise figures for these two departments, Manav took a day to drill down further and then reported back to Vasudha. They found that while some doctors in the department had shown better numbers, there was one doctor each in both the departments who had shown huge declines in the numbers. Vasudha and Manav started brainstorming on what the problem could be. They called Dr. Madhusudhan to discuss the findings. It was important that confidentiality be maintained around this in order to be able to figure out the problem and fix it.

Dr. Madhusudhan was instructed to have one person each from his team closely follow each of these two doctors and their activities during the next two weeks. They were asked to be extremely careful in their work so as not to raise any suspicion.

At the end of two weeks, a beaming Dr. Madhusudhan walked into Vasudha’s cabin and presented his findings. The two doctors were regularly sending their cases to other hospitals. One of them had already started performing some surgeries in other hospitals. Dr. Madhusudhan handed over documentary evidence in the form of prescriptions, notes made on rough paper in the doctors’ handwriting, CCTV evidence and recorded patient voices.

Vasudha called Manav over and showed the report to him. Now the question was how they should handle this? Manav suggested that they talk to the doctors in private, confront them with the evidence and give them a last warning. Dr. Madhusudhan, on the other hand, felt that terminating them was the only way they could send a strong message to the entire hospital that they meant business.

Vasudha said she agreed with Dr. Madhusudhan. Termination letters were typed out and sent to the two doctors immediately. The other doctors were also informed about the decision along with the rationale behind the decision. The two heads of departments came to meet her and requested her to give the two doctors another chance. Vasudha refused to listen.

Manav then had a brainwave. He suggested that they hold a press conference and announce the termination. They would also go into the reasons behind the termination. They could cover in detail how they were trying to bring a change in the way healthcare was delivered. That way they would get a lot of publicity  and that too for free!

Vasudha loved the ideal.

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